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Gonorrhea and Chlamydia Test: Teen Version

What is a gonorrhea and chlamydia test?

This test check for 2 common sexually transmitted diseases or infections (also called an STD or STI):

  • Chlamydia, which is caused by bacteria called Chlamydia.
  • Gonorrhea, which is caused by bacteria called Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

Why is this test done?

This test is done to see if you have gonorrhea or chlamydial infection. These serious infections may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, if they are not treated, they can cause pain and serious health problems, such as arthritis and infertility.

How do I prepare for the test?

  • Women do not need to do anything to prepare for this test.
  • If you are a man and a sample is being taken from your penis, do not urinate for 3 to 4 hours before the test.
  • You may need to avoid taking certain medicines before the test because they might affect the test result. Make sure your healthcare provider knows about any medicines, herbs, or supplements that you are taking. Ask your provider before stopping any of your regular medicines.

Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions about the test.

How is the test done?

There are 2 main ways to test for these infections:

  • A urine test
  • Swabs of fluid from the infected area (the penis, cervix, anus, throat, or eyes). The sample is sent to the lab and tested. If you have an infection, it may take several days to find out what kind of germ is causing it. Knowing what germ is causing the infection helps your provider choose the right medicine to treat it.

Ask your healthcare provider when and how you will get the result of your test.

What do the test results mean?

A positive test result means that you have an infection. Sometimes you may have both types of infection. If you have a positive result, your healthcare provider will prescribe treatment with antibiotics.

When you test positive, the results may be reported (without giving your name) to the local health department and your sexual partner(s). This will help your partner(s) get prompt testing and treatment for the infection. It can also help prevent new infections.

What if my test result is not normal?

Test results are only one part of a larger picture that takes into account your medical history and current health. Sometimes a test needs to be repeated to check the first result. Talk to your healthcare provider about your result and ask questions, such as:

  • If you need more tests
  • What kind of treatment you might need
  • When it is safe to have sex again
  • How to protect yourself against reinfection
Developed by RelayHealth.
Pediatric Advisor 2015.2 published by RelayHealth.
Last modified: 2014-10-30
Last reviewed: 2014-10-30
This content is reviewed periodically and is subject to change as new health information becomes available. The information is intended to inform and educate and is not a replacement for medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional.
Copyright ©1986-2015 McKesson Corporation and/or one of its subsidiaries. All rights reserved.
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