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Trampoline and Bounce House Safety

Thousands of children are injured each year as a result of trampolines and bounce houses. Children can be injured by colliding with others, or when they fall off the trampoline or fall out of the bounce house. Injuries are more likely when children of different sizes are jumping at the same time.

Injuries can happen to any part of the body from a collision or fall. Head and neck injuries are the most serious. Neck injuries usually happen when children try to do flips and land on their head or neck instead of their feet. Children can be paralyzed for life from a trampoline injury. The injury rate is highest for children younger than 6 years old.

If you have a trampoline, check your homeowner insurance policy to find out if an injury claim would be covered. If it is not covered, consider adding an injury rider to your policy.

How can I make bouncing safer?

  • Keep the trampoline or bounce house away from trees, fences, poles, or walls. Make sure it is on a flat surface. Try to put it in an area with a softer surface, like grass, rather than gravel or mulch.
  • Use a net to enclose trampolines.
  • Have children remove any necklaces, eyeglasses, or sharp objects from pockets before jumping.
  • Do not allow children under 6 years of age to use a trampoline or bounce house.
  • If you allow more than one child to use a bounce house at the same time, make sure the children are about the same size.
  • Never allow more than one child at a time to use a trampoline.
  • Have an adult spotter watching the children when they are bouncing.
  • Do not let children bounce to jump off.
Written by Robert Brayden, MD, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Colorado School of Medicine.
Pediatric Advisor 2015.2 published by RelayHealth.
Last modified: 2014-10-20
Last reviewed: 2014-07-14
This content is reviewed periodically and is subject to change as new health information becomes available. The information is intended to inform and educate and is not a replacement for medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional.
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